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Russian Cruiser turn of the Century

AS07 - 34.95 1/350 scale very nice detail.

 

On May 27-28, 1905, the decisive battle of the Russo-Japanese war – the Battle of Tsushima – took place in the Korean straits. What do Russians know about these hundred year old historical events?On May 27-28, 1905, the decisive battle of the Russo-Japanese war – the Battle of Tsushima – took place in the Korean straits. What do Russians know about these hundred year old historical events?

Asked what associations “Tsushima” evoked, 24% of respondents recalled the defeat of the Russian Baltic Fleet, as well as other episodes of the 1904-05 war. Another 13% made general comments about Japan. Almost two-thirds of those surveyed (62%) gave no reply to the question.Asked what associations “Tsushima” evoked, 24% of respondents recalled the defeat of the Russian Baltic Fleet, as well as other episodes of the 1904-05 war. Another 13% made general comments about Japan. Almost two-thirds of those surveyed (62%) gave no reply to the question.

At the same time the majority of Russians said they “know” or “had heard something” about the Russo-Japanese war (34% and 39%, respectively), and 19% said they never heard of it before. However, only 28% managed to remember particular events from the war. Respondents mentioned the siege of Port Arthur (8%), the last fight of the cruiser Varyag (8%), and the Battle of Tsushima (9%). Around 7% gave general assessments of the war: At the same time the majority of Russians said they “know” or “had heard something” about the Russo-Japanese war (34% and 39%, respectively), and 19% said they never heard of it before. However, only 28% managed to remember particular events from the war. Respondents mentioned the siege of Port Arthur (8%), the last fight of the cruiser Varyag (8%), and the Battle of Tsushima (9%). Around 7% gave general assessments of the war:

"It was a great naval war”; “We lost because of poor military equipment compared to the Japanese”; “It was a disgraceful defeat”; “Russian soldiers died for God knows what”; “Our fleet fought to the utmost and would not surrender". (answer to open-ended question)."It was a great naval war”; “We lost because of poor military equipment compared to the Japanese”; “It was a disgraceful defeat”; “Russian soldiers died for God knows what”; “Our fleet fought to the utmost and would not surrender". (answer to open-ended question).

Perceptions and knowledge of historical events form in people’s minds mainly due to their value aspect. Especially important is the mechanism of glorification, which can impart a particular sense to historical facts and thus strengthen their perception in people’s minds. It is indicative that only 12% of respondents called the Battle of Tsushima the most decisive episode of the war, although many people (24%) have a definite idea of this battle, notwithstanding the fact that its anniversary was mentioned widely in the media recently. The sinking of the cruiser Varyag, an event that little influenced the course of war, but which bears a more distinct notional value, comes in first – 20%. The heroic defense of Port Arthur has a similar value, and is next at 19%. The bloody battles of Mukden and Liaoyang were not mentioned once: obviously these names, also mentioned in school history classes, conveyed nothing to respondents.Perceptions and knowledge of historical events form in people’s minds mainly due to their value aspect. Especially important is the mechanism of glorification, which can impart a particular sense to historical facts and thus strengthen their perception in people’s minds. It is indicative that only 12% of respondents called the Battle of Tsushima the most decisive episode of the war, although many people (24%) have a definite idea of this battle, notwithstanding the fact that its anniversary was mentioned widely in the media recently. The sinking of the cruiser Varyag, an event that little influenced the course of war, but which bears a more distinct notional value, comes in first – 20%. The heroic defense of Port Arthur has a similar value, and is next at 19%. The bloody battles of Mukden and Liaoyang were not mentioned once: obviously these names, also mentioned in school history classes, conveyed nothing to respondents.

The most unexpected results, however, came from another question: how did the war end for Russia – in victory or defeat? Only one-third of respondents (35%) said Russia lost the war; 27% think Russia won, while 38% found it difficult to answer. This is where a significant difference comes up between those who “know” and those who “have heard something” about the Russo-Japanese war. Among the former, 65% say the war was lost, while 24% hold the opposite opinion. The latter speak more often about a Russian victory - 37%, against 30% who believe that our nation won.The most unexpected results, however, came from another question: how did the war end for Russia – in victory or defeat? Only one-third of respondents (35%) said Russia lost the war; 27% think Russia won, while 38% found it difficult to answer. This is where a significant difference comes up between those who “know” and those who “have heard something” about the Russo-Japanese war. Among the former, 65% say the war was lost, while 24% hold the opposite opinion. The latter speak more often about a Russian victory - 37%, against 30% who believe that our nation won.